Studying Abroad in London? Here’s How To Get An Internship

Studying abroad offers many opportunities: an intimate connection with a new culture, a change of scenery from Washington Square, and a way to show off your Speaking Freely skills and impress attractive, exotic people.

For many of us, it also means a disruption of jobs, faculty relationships, and all the connections we’ve been working to make it here in the Big Apple. With internships ending and beginning in NYC without us there to take them, studying abroad can start to seem like one big vacation–one we can’t afford to take.

Luckily, NYU has begun a partnership with EUSA, a non profit organization that specializes in working with universities to place students in internships in London, Dublin, Madrid, Paris, and Geneva. This is important for students studying abroad in London, who are now able to take advantage of the partnership.

Students apply to EUSA through the NYU page and, once accepted, are personally paired with abroad companies and institutions that fit the student’s academic and career interests. While students can request specific job sites that they’ve investigated on their own, they are encouraged to rely on the connections pre-established by EUSA and London companies. Students benefit from this prior connection, and are put at an advantage in the competitive job market.

The internships under EUSA are not paid, but are part of your course load within NYU. Students are usually expected to work a 9-5 shift twice a week, in addition to the other 14 credits they are allowed to take. If a non-paid internship is too much, remember that you can also supplement it with abroad scholarships and non-paid internship scholarships.

This partnership gives students who were once at a disadvantage against local students a voice in the often exclusive international internship market. It still remains to be seen whether EUSA will prove to be a fruitful venture, but here’s hoping it helps you land the internship you’ve always wanted.

 

[image via]

Comments

    Share Your Thoughts

    1 Comment

  1. Catherine Cilek says

    what is not mentioned is the hundreds of dollars one has to pay for a work visa to then work in an unpaid internship…not cool