Philip Seymour Hoffman’s Apartment Rented Out For An Extra Five Hundred Per Month

The late Philip Seymour Hoffman’s apartment stayed on the market for exactly one day. The 1,100-square-foot condo located on Bethune St. near the High Line was rented out on Friday for the steep price of $10,500 a month. Hoffman, who died on February 2nd after a heroin overdose, paid $9,995 a month for the space.

Corcoran.com listed Hoffman’s old pad as available on April 15th. The apartment has two bedrooms and two bathrooms, hardwood floors, a wood-burning fireplace, and ten-foot wood-beamed ceilings. Sounds very cozy.

The Corcoran Group’s summary of the condo states, “The light is superb all around with west and north exposures, and it is all set amongst abundant trees with views of sky, and overlooking charming brownstones. It feels like living in the country, in the most exciting part of the city.”

It sounds like a nice condo. However, the “full skyline view” and “exposed brick” listed on the website do nothing to explain the $505 dollar bump in rental price following Hoffman’s death. Perhaps the excitement of renting the apartment that the late star used as a private drug lounge can account for the discrepancy in cost?

A more honest summary of the condo might plausibly read: “Enjoy the very same oversized windows and impressive view of the skyline that Philip Seymour Hoffman gazed out upon before his death.” Call me crazy, but raising the price of a rental following the death of the previous owner seems a little tacky. The cost per month of any other apartment would certainly not have gone up after the death of its previous tenant.

However, you can’t really fault the Corcoran Group for capitalizing on an opportunity to rent out a property for a larger profit than was previously being made. After all, the condo only stayed on the market for a single day.

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  1. Paul Goss says

    Don’t forget, the late actor used the bathroom there too! :) that should add value to the property right?