Good Riddance, NYU: 50 Things We Will Not Miss About Our Time Here

Fellow seniors: have you been feeling ultra nostalgic lately? Have you been belligerently screaming to your friends “I can’t believe it’s oveeeeeeeeeeeer!” every night you go out for the past five months? Are you currently scrolling through old Facebook photos of Hayden parties to arouse some sort of internal reconciliation that yes, college is over and it’s time for you to put your real-world pants on? Well, stop. Please.

Over the past four years, we, NYU Local co-EIC Myles Tanzer and Editors Leah Clancy and John Surico, have been collecting our grievances with the “community” here on Washington Square Park. Yes, of course, it’s sad that you can’t throw up on the bar at Coyote Ugly and use college as an excuse anymore. And it’s sad you won’t feel a part of the campus that you’ve called home since September of 2009. But replace despair with relief. Because there’s a lot of things we’re very, very happy to see come to an end.


Local Learns Politics: How We Go To War In 2013

Poli-tricks, poli-ticks, politics. The intricacies of government and society are supposed to make your head hurt—simply because none of them actually make a shred of sense. Game theory never helped anyone either. But that’s what defines politics: a bunch of nonsense packaged into a somewhat sustainable rule of law. We know the topic can be yawn-inducing, confusing and nauseating but, hey, it’s in the news so we might as well take a shot at disassembling and digesting this mess for the greater good.

And that’s what “Local Learns Politics” is all about.

On May 1st, 2003, former President George W. Bush delivered a speech on the deck of the U.S.S. Abraham Lincoln in front of a large banner that read “Mission Accomplished.” It was the culmination of America’s return after 9/11: Apaches had just bombed downtown Baghdad to smithereens, Saddam Hussein was in our custody, everyone in the country was bumping “Hey Ya” and 50 Cent just dropped Get Rich or Die Tryin’. Uncle Sam was back and better than ever.

And, of course now, we know the rest of the story. Operation Iraqi Freedom had opened a can of blood-sucking worms centuries in the making. Hussein’s removal would ignite a decade-long civil war between the Sunnis, Shi’ites and Kurds, with the troops of the American occupation standing right in its crossfire. Its result? The death of 4,000 soldiers and over tens of thousands of Iraqi citizens; a fractured Mesopotamian democracy; a half-ass stalemate on America’s lengthy war record. “Mission Accomplished” was the farthest thing from the truth.

Last Monday, we “celebrated” the tenth anniversary of Dubya’s terribly ironic address but coincidence could not have struck at a worse time. Enter Syria.

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NYU Silver School Of Social Work To Hold No Confidence Vote On Sexton

A month and a half ago, the faculty of the College of Arts and Science declared, in a 298 to 224 vote, that they, as a governing body, did not have confidence in President John Sexton’s leadership. Since then, it’s been pretty quiet on the Washington Square front as other NYU schools stalled in following suit with a vote. Except the faculty of NYU Law School, Sexton’s old stomping grounds as dean, did not: they voted in confidence of their old boss.

But, last night, the departmental backlash against President John Sexton gained yet another footing. The NYU Silver School of Social Work, comprised of 52 full-time professors, has chosen to hold a no confidence vote of Sexton.

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The Boston Marathon Bombings: The Latest Updates, NYU’s Response, And What You Can Do To Help


Authorities are still searching today for a suspect in yesterday’s deadly bombings at the finish line of the Boston marathon, which killed 3 people and injured 176, according to the most recent reports. Although there were numerous rumors that a suspect was detained yesterday following the detonation of two explosive devices, officials running the investigation have denied that they have anyone in custody in relation to the attack at this time. However an apartment was searched early this morning in the Boston suburb of Revere in connection to the bombings, according to authorities. Police were seen removing numerous paper bags and a duffel bag from the scene but no arrests were made. Read more…


[VIDEO] NYU Local Talks Politics: What’s Up With Same-Sex Marriage’s Legal Future?

As you have probably heard by now (or seen everyone’s red-and-equal-sign Facebook profile photo), same-sex marriage came to the Supreme Court last week. The Nine heard from supporters and opposers on the legality of the Defense of Marriage Act and Prop 8 – two cases that could have tidal-wave shifts on the state of these laws across the country. Although cable news provided their fair share of coverage on the issue, we felt that the serious constitutional implications of the issue did not get their time of day.

We [the National Section Editors, John Surico and Jeremy Unger] spoke with NYU politics professor and law school affiliate Christine Harrington – for politics majors, you know her as the professor that teaches “Civil Liberties,” “Law and Society” and a few other constitutional seminars. Also, she predicted the outcome of the Obamacare case… so here’s our conversation with her about the legal battle for same-sex marriage in America.


Senior Bucket List: We Went To Shabbat And J. Sex Brought His Dog

The seniors of NYU Local have put together the ultimate bucket list for NYU’s class of 2013. Most of us have spent the last four years under our covers blogging in front of the soft glow of our warm laptops — it’s time we got out out the house.

This past Friday, we sent three Gentiles and their Jewish spiritual advisor to Shabbat dinner. Although the Senior Bucket List stated “Enjoy Shabbat at Weinstein (bonus points if you’re Gentile),” the rules were bent a bit for time, place and manner. The Global Center for Academic and Spiritual Life (GCASL) held the Bridges Jum’ah/Shabbat day services and dinner, inviting both the Jewish and Muslim communities to come together for this special occasion. So we had no idea what we were walking into.

Upon arrival, our spiritual advisor forced us to schmooze. And, within the first fifteen minutes or so, President John Sexton showed up to the celebration, dog cradled in hand. As Gentiles, we were penetrating a network previously unknown to us. Andrew was on the lookout for his future Jewish galpal/wife (he came up empty-handed… again), McKenzie beelined towards Sexton to get her first hug (“So how do we do this?,” she asked him) and John couldn’t keep his paws off the frisky pup known as LEGS.

We thought we were showing up for free food before Friday night’s festivities but, instead, we got something really special in return.


Senior Bucket List: We Went Swimming In Palladium (NSFW)


The seniors of NYU Local have put together the ultimate bucket list for NYU’s class of 2013. Most of us have spent the last four years under our covers blogging in front of the soft glow of our warm laptops — it’s time we got out out the house.

10. Swim at Palladium

If there was ever a day to go for a dip in the Palladium pool, it was this past Saturday afternoon. We met up at three in the musty locker rooms outside the natatorium — after silently (and shamefully) stripping in front of a bunch of strangers, it was go time. But first, as per NYU law, we had to take mandatory showers to get nice and wet before we hopped into the swim lanes. Andrew was sporting his favorite orange swim trunks from Banana Republic and John did his best to keep his heavy, soaked Converse cut-offs from sinking down to his ankles.

Slippity dippity wackiness ensued.

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Local Learns Politics: Flip-Flopping Is Too Easy If Your Friends Are Already Doing It

Poli-tricks, poli-ticks, politics. The intricacies of government and society are supposed to make your head hurt—simply because none of them actually make any shred of sense. Game theory never helped anyone either. But that’s what defines politics: a bunch of nonsense packaged into a somewhat sustainable rule of law. We know the topic can be yawn-inducing, confusing and nauseating but, hey, it’s in the news so we might as well take a utilitarian shot at disassembling and digesting this mess for the greater good. And that’s what “Local Learns Politics” is all about.

The week after Election Day last year, we published an article entitled, “Elephant In The Room: Five Ways Republicans Can Get Elected Again.” It was a clarion call for the right to get their act together — after a semi-rough beat down at the ballot, all media outlets were producing similar content that basically drove home the stuck-in-the-1950s point. This was a party that praised ultrasounds, ostracized immigrants, dawned the face of the ultra-rich, fell slave to the Tea Party and, most importantly for this piece, chastised same-sex marriage to the point of no return.

Or so we thought. Since then, the Republicans have listened to the advice given here and almost everywhere elsewhere (well, sorta). As of this week, more than 80 ‘prominent‘ Republican figures have signed an amicus curae brief for the upcoming Supreme Court showdown on same-sex marriage. In it, they’re pleading to the American people that they, just like President Obama, have “evolved” on their views.

And, just like Mr. Obama, the party at large will eventually win this blatant reverse of opinion with voters. Because it’s not that hard to flip-flop under peer pressure. Any pot-hater-turned-stoner can teach you that.

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Endorse Me For ‘Post-Grad Anxiety’: The Millennial Guide To LinkedIn

In more ways than none, social media is intended for the youth. Facebook, in its baby steps, was limited to college students as Mark Zuckerberg stuck close to his ‘Erica Albright’s a bitch,” late-night blogging days at Harvard and Sean Parker (or Justin Timberlake – whoever you prefer to envision) got busted for coke at that frat party. And it continues to be dominated by the age group of 18-30, even if your aunt just texted you, “Hey, I’m on Facebook now! Your pictures are a little raunchy, don’t you think?” The same demographic rules apply for Twitter, Tumblr, Pinterest and Instagram – you name the platform, and we Millennials are still hashtagging in hordes.

But, the other day, a friend of mine told me that her dad called her, demanding that she needs to get a LinkedIn ASAP or she can kiss post-grad employment goodbye. With that being said, enter LinkedIn. You may have heard of this ‘professional’ networking platform started a few years back (if in Stern, disregard this quick synopsis). It’s basically what your parents dream the Internet is really like: social media of adults, for adults and by adults. LinkedIn is Facebook for the office (think: Christian Mingle meets the water cooler). And, sorry to be the bearer of bad news, but as us Myspacers-turned-Facebookers-turned-Tweeters inch closer towards graduation, it’s almost to safe to say that we’ll soon be logging in to check who ‘connected’ with us.

But don’t you worry. Here at NYU Local, we’re here to guide you through this confusingly post-pubescent time of your online life. Warning: you might be sending out some business e-mails by the end of this. Welcome to the world of LinkedIn.

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NYU Students Planning To Create America’s First University-Wide PAC

To start simple, PACs are short for Political Action Committees. Limited to donations of $1,000 for state or local officials and $5,000 for federal offices, these aren’t the mega-million SuperPACs of Citizens United notoriety – we’ll talk about that another time. In classic political folklore, PACs are the financial glue that sticks your ordinary citizen to the political arena, substituting that sign that says ‘Vote For Nader’ with some cold hard bucks siphoned into the wallets of specific candidates, campaigns or ballot initiatives that share the same beliefs of said PAC.

And, now, it seems as if NYU could have one of its own.

If approved by the College of Arts and Science, a project started by CAS junior Taher Hassonjee will make New York University the first college in the country to ever have a PAC. Yes, a University-wide political fundraising machine in the school’s name that will gather donations to support agreed-upon officials running for some sort of governmental position. Aided by Professors Anna Harvey and Patrick Egan of the school’s Politics Department, Hassonjee came up with the idea after he took a semester off to fill a position as Deputy Finance Director of a Congressional campaign in Philadelphia. There, he discovered a top-down mantra of modern-day political strategy: money talks louder than… well, anything.

As a result, Hassonjee decided to bring this attitude back to Washington Square Park and, voila, the idea for NYU PAC was born.

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